Second Oldest Electric Cooperative In America

   
Significant Historical Events of
Pontotoc Electric Power Association
                                                                       by Chuck Howell
 
            The first organizational meeting for Pontotoc County Electric Power Association was held on Saturday, September 30, 1933 at the Pontotoc County Courthouse. From this meeting, Mr. M. L. Higgs was named president and Mr. C. P. Shannon was named secretary [1]. On Friday, February 23, 1934, Pontotoc County Electric Power Association was legally incorporated under the laws of the State of Mississippi [2]. The newly created federal agency known as the Tennessee Valley Authority had purchased the assets of the Mississippi Power Company in the counties of Alcorn, Benton, Itawamba, Lee, Prentiss, Pontotoc, Tippah, and Union Counties in Northeast Mississippi for $850,743 during the first week of January 1934 [3]. Due to the high capital costs of line construction in rural areas with very low customer densities, Mississippi Power Company served only the towns proper and practically none of the rural areas in these counties. Following this purchase, the Tennessee Valley Authority began to erect rural distribution lines in Pontotoc County during 1934 to the rural communities of Springville, Randolph and Toccopola. At midnight between Thursday, February 28 and Friday, March 1, 1935, the Tennessee Valley Authority read a meter on a primary metering point located on State Highway 6 at the Lee-Pontotoc County line and officially transferred its interests in the electric distribution system to Pontotoc County Electric Power Association [4]. From this time forward, Pontotoc County Electric Power Association began supplying its consumers with electricity, thus becoming the second oldest rural electric cooperative in the United States.   Alcorn County Electric Power Association, located at Corinth, Mississippi became the first rural electric cooperative in the United States and began serving customers on June 1, 1934 [5].   Prentiss County Electric Power Association, located at Booneville, Mississippi became the third rural electric cooperative in the United States and began serving customers on June 20, 1935 [6].
            In 1936, Pontotoc County Electric Power Association extended its lines to Bruce and Pittsboro in Calhoun County. On August 14, 1936, the name was changed and re-incorporated as Pontotoc Electric Power Association to reflect a regional service territory instead of a one-county service territory [7]. 
            The Board of Aldermen of the City of Pontotoc recommended the purchase of the first two traffic signals in June 1937 to be installed in downtown Pontotoc, according to an article published in The Pontotoc Progress newspaper on June 10, 1937. At that time, traffic signals only used red and green signals [8]. 
            In June 1937, the headquarters for the crew of workmen who were to build a 44,000-volt transmission line from Tupelo to Sardis Dam was established in Pontotoc. Also, a part of this building program included the construction of a substation in Pontotoc, which was to be located a short distance west of town. The purpose of the new transmission line and substation was to regulate the voltage so that there would not be any variations at any time, regardless of how much current was being used [9]. The line was completed by August 15, 1937 and the new substation was complete with the exception of the oil switches which had not yet been delivered [10].
            An announcement was made on May 22, 1947 in The Pontotoc Progress newspaper that the Tennessee Valley Authority had increased the transformer capacity at the Pontotoc Substation to provide for additional loads of Pontotoc Electric Power Association. In addition, TVA planned to extend a 44-kV transmission line from Houston to Calhoun City by way of Bruce and install a new substation at Bruce. The changes would make it possible for TVA to provide additional power to the Pontotoc Electric Power Association at Bruce and to the Natchez Trace Electric Power Association at Calhoun City [11]. A photograph of the Pontotoc Substation after the increase in transformer capacity in 1947 is shown in Figure 1.
 
        
Figure 1:  Photograph of Pontotoc Substation located on Inzer Street in the Year 1947
      (Courtesy of Pontotoc Electric Power Association archives)
 
Pontotoc Electric Power Association began its business operation in a two-story building on the northeast corner of Liberty Street and Marion Street in Pontotoc [12]. The building also had a partial basement. A present-day photograph of this building is shown in Figure 2 after the building had been remodeled in 2005 for use as a law office by the present owners.   
                       
Figure 2: Present-day photograph of the building on the northeast corner of Liberty
                 and Marion Streets, which is the same location as the first office of Pontotoc
                 Electric Power Association after 1935
               
On Thursday, January 12, 1950, a contract was awarded to J. E. Staub and Company of Fulton, Mississippi for the remodeling of the old Pontotoc Wholesale Grocery Company buildings for a new office for Pontotoc Electric Power Association, located on the northeast corner of Main Street and Jefferson Street. A photograph of the old Pontotoc Wholesale Grocery Company building is shown in Figure 3.
                     
Figure 3:  Photograph of Pontotoc Wholesale Grocery Company building on Main Street
                  before remodeling for new Pontotoc Electric Power Association office
                 (Courtesy of Pontotoc Electric Power Association archives)
According to the article published in The Pontotoc Progress newspaper on January 19, 1950, “The remodeling job includes a year-round heating and air conditioning system, partitioning of office space, engineering and drafting room, meter laboratory, vault for storage of records, auditorium for seating about 45 people, appliance demonstration room, completely changing the west and south sides into glass exteriors with canopy all around, new flooring, walls, etc. to make the building one of the most modern in the state.” [13]. A photograph of the Pontotoc Electric Power Association building after remodeling is shown in Figure 4. 
       
 Figure 4:  Photograph of the Pontotoc Electric Power Association building
                  at 12 South Main Street in Pontotoc as it appeared in 1950
                  (Courtesy of Pontotoc Electric Power Association archives)
 
The building maintained this outside appearance until it was remodeled again in 1988. The architect for the 1988 remodeling was Bowman and Bowman Architects of Greenwood, Mississippi and the general contractor was Hooker Construction Company of Thaxton, Mississippi. A present-day photograph of the building which reflects the 1988 remodeling is shown in Figure 5.
 
Figure 5:  Present-day photograph of the Pontotoc Electric Power Association building
                  at 12 South Main Street in Pontotoc which reflects the remodeling of 1988
 
On Monday night, January 29, 1951, a devastating ice storm hit Pontotoc Electric’s power system and caused the power to be off and lines down everywhere. Superintendent J. C. Sneed, Jr. announced in the local newspaper that he needed 150 workmen with saws and axes to clear the lines, and that considerable damage was caused at the TVA substation in Pontotoc. Restoring power to some customers took fifteen days [14]. This ice storm was referred to as The Great Ice Storm of 1951. It affected all of north Mississippi, the upper corner of northwest Alabama, most all of west and middle Tennessee, nearly all of Kentucky, and part of southern Ohio. Following the storm the area was covered by several inches of snow. To make matters worse, record cold temperatures came in the days that followed, and travel was very difficult. One difference in the 1951 Ice Storm to ice storms of later years was that most people affected by the 1951 Ice Storm remembered a time before they had electricity, so they were more accustomed to living without the conveniences that electricity provides. 
 
In 1953, a branch office was built in Bruce, Mississippi on South Newberger Street. The contract for the 2400-square-foot brick building was awarded to Luckett Lumber Company of Grenada, Mississippi [15]. A photograph of how the original branch office in Bruce looked is shown in Figure 6.                    
                           
  
Figure 6: Photograph of Pontotoc Electric Power Association’s branch office
                  building in Bruce, Mississippi, built in 1954
                  (Courtesy of Pontotoc Electric Power Association archives)
 
 
In 1956, under the leadership of General Manager J. C. Sneed, Jr., Pontotoc Electric Power Association bought the first bucket truck in the state, known by the trade name “Sky Worker.” This bucket truck had a working height of 40 feet [16]. The Association paid $10,000 for it, and a fellow manager of another electric system said, “Sneed has lost his mind spending that kind of money for a bucket truck.” Sneed later said, “We used that first bucket for 14 years and sold it for $9,000. I think it was a pretty good investment.” [17]. A photograph of the bucket truck which appeared in the December 6, 1956 edition of The Pontotoc Progress newspaper is shown in Figure 7.
                             
Figure 7: Photograph of first bucket truck, known as the “Sky Worker,” purchased by
                   Pontotoc Electric in December 1956.
                   (Courtesy of The Pontotoc Progress newspaper)
 
 
In 1962, in order to meet growing power demands in northern Calhoun County, TVA increased the capacity of the Bruce Substation from 3,000 kVA to 7,500 kVA at a cost of nearly $100,000 [18]. Another significant improvement was made in 1963 when TVA rebuilt the Pontotoc substation, which included increasing the capacity of the transformers from 10,000 to 60,000 kVA and adding more distribution feeder circuit breakers [19]. In 1968, a 10,000 kVA substation was built at Ecru, Mississippi to provide more reliable service to the communities of Ecru and Ingomar, and also the southern part of Union County and the northern part of Pontotoc County [20]. Also in 1968, Pontotoc Electric paid off its loan to the Rural Electrification Administration and became one of the few rural electric cooperatives in America to become debt free [21]. 
Shortly after noon on Sunday, January 7, 1973, an ice storm hit Pontotoc Electric’s service territory and by mid-afternoon practically a complete total power outage had occurred. Electric service was restored to approximately 75 percent of all customers by late Monday afternoon and to 90 percent by Tuesday afternoon [22].        
In 1974, the Bruce, Mississippi substation was rebuilt with two new 16,700 kVA transformers and more distribution feeder circuit breakers to accommodate the increased electrical growth in Bruce and northern Calhoun County [23].   In October 1975, a new 15,000 square foot warehouse and operations center was completed on Highway 41, southeast of Pontotoc. An additional 5,000 square foot truck parking bay was also part of the facility [24]. 
                         
                                                                                                                                                                                 
Figure 8: Photograph of the Pontotoc Electric Power Association Construction and
                 Operations Warehouse (front view) on Highway 41, southwest of Pontotoc
                  in 1975. (Courtesy of Pontotoc Electric Power Association archives)
 
                     
Figure 9: Photograph of the Pontotoc Electric Power Association Construction and
                  Operations Warehouse (truck bay) on Highway 41, southwest of Pontotoc
                   in 1975. (Courtesy of Pontotoc Electric Power Association archives)
 
            In September 1982, a new substation was placed into operation with two 25,000 kVA transformers in the Bankhead community along State Highway 6. The Bankhead Substation serves the eastern part of Pontotoc County, including the communities of Bankhead, Chesterville, Endville, Furrs, Locust Hill, Longview, Valley Grove, and Zion.  
On Wednesday night, February 9, 1994, a devastating ice storm swept across North Mississippi and knocked out electrical service to over 15,000 of Pontotoc Electric’s customers, and to every circuit except one on the entire power system. The following Monday, an estimated 3,000 customers were still without power, although power had been restored to most all critical loads, which included hospitals, nursing homes, schools and factories. Getting power restored to some customers took up to eleven days. An article in the local newspaper described the storm to be the worst winter storm to hit North Mississippi in 43 years [25]. A photograph taken during the 1994 Ice Storm showing damage to a transformer bank pole is shown in Figure 10.
 
        
Figure 10:  Photograph of broken pole with a three-phase transformer bank
                   attached during the 1994 Ice Storm.
                   (Courtesy of The Pontotoc Progress newspaper)
 
In the spring of 1998, a new substation was built west of Pontotoc in the McGregor’s Chapel area along what was then State Highway 6, now Veterans Highway West. This 161,000-volt substation would serve the communities of Buchanan, Buckhorn, Judah, Lone Star, Macedonia, South Pontotoc, Springville, Randolph, Robbs, Shady Grove, Toccopola, West Pontotoc, the Pontotoc County Industrial Park, other rural areas on the western side of Pontotoc County, and the Spring Hill Community in southeastern Lafayette County. A dedication and ribbon cutting ceremony for the 1.8 million dollar substation was held on Tuesday, November 17, 1998 with directors and employees of Pontotoc Electric, public officials, TVA officials, Mississippi National Guard Color Guard, Mississippi Highway Patrolmen, Pontotoc High School Band members, area power distributors, economic development officials, engineers, contractors, and the general public attending the event [26]. Although the new substation had previously been tested, the substation transformers were ceremonially energized during this event, followed by lunch served to all those attending. A photograph taken during the dedication and ribbon cutting event is shown in Figure 11.
 
              
Figure 11:  Photograph of the McGregor’s Chapel Substation dedication and ribbon
                    cutting ceremony held on Tuesday, November 17, 1998
        (Courtesy of Pontotoc Electric Power Association archives)
 
On December 23, 1998, an ice storm struck much of north Mississippi, but due to increased efforts in trimming trees along the power line rights-of ways, only 5,500 of Pontotoc Electric’s 15,500 customers had their power interrupted. All but approximately 35 customers had their power restored within two days, and these remaining customers had their power restored on the third day. 
A special honor bestowed on Pontotoc Electric Power Association occurred on Wednesday, April 19, 2000 when the Tennessee Valley Authority chose to have their monthly Board of Directors meeting in Pontotoc, Mississippi at the Conference Room of Pontotoc Electric Power Association. The event began at 9:00 a.m. that morning. This was one of the first times that the TVA Board of Directors chose to hold their Board meeting outside of their corporate headquarters in Knoxville, Tennessee. A reception was held the evening before at the Pontotoc Community House with several high level TVA officials, power distributor officials, community and economic leaders from all over Northeast Mississippi, and public officials including United States Congressman Roger Wicker. The TVA Board was composed at that time of Glenn L. McCullough, Jr., Chairman, Director Skila Harris and Director Craven Crowell. A large crowd attended both the reception and the Board Meeting. The TVA Directors were extremely complimentary of how they were welcomed by the community. At the reception, each of the three TVA Board Members were presented a framed copy of the “First TVA Pole” set on January 22, 1934 at the location southwest of Pontotoc, compliments of Pontotoc Electric. A photograph of the Board Meeting is shown in Figure 12.
                                                                                                             
 
Figure 12: Photograph of the Tennessee Valley Authority Board of Directors Meeting 
On Saturday night, February 24, 2001, at approximately 10:00 p.m., an F4 tornado did major damage over a path twenty-three miles long in Pontotoc County, causing considerable damage to Pontotoc Electric’s power system. With the help of several neighboring cooperative and municipal power system crews, and having tie lines in place which allowed portions of the power system to be fed from alternate substations, nearly all customers that could receive power had their electric service restored in no more than three days. However, it took several weeks to restore the power system from the damage caused by this tornado. Two photographs of the tornado damage and the restoration of the power system along Highway 41 South and Highway 15 South are shown in Figures 13 and 14.
                                          
Figure 13: Photograph of power line reconstruction following a tornado that
                   struck Pontotoc County on February 24, 2001. Scene is along
                   Highway 41 South looking toward the northwest.
                        (Courtesy of Pontotoc Electric Power Association archieves)
       
                            
Figure 14: Photograph of power line reconstruction following a tornado that
                    struck Pontotoc County on February 24, 2001. Scene is along
                    Highway 15 South looking toward the north.
                         (Courtesy of Pontotoc Electric Power Association archieves)
Although much less severe than most of Mississippi, Pontotoc Electric did not escape the damaging effects of Hurricane Katrina on Monday, August 29, 2005. Though the hurricane had weakened in intensity by the time it reached North Mississippi, it was still classified as a Category One Hurricane as it passed across Pontotoc Electric’s power system. Winds from the hurricane began to cause damage around 5:00 p.m. and appeared to be at their worst around 8:30 P.M. on that Monday evening. By midnight, the damaging winds had subsided. The restoration from Hurricane Katrina on Pontotoc Electric’s system was completed by Thursday morning on September 1, 2005.
The front of Pontotoc Electric’s branch office at Bruce, Mississippi was completely remodeled in 2005 and a public open house was held on Tuesday, August 30, 2005. Employees had been up most of the night dealing with the power outages caused by Hurricane Katrina, but were far enough along to have the open house as scheduled [27].   A photograph of the Bruce Branch Office after the 2005 remodeling is shown in Figure 15.
            
 
Figure 15: Photograph of Pontotoc Electric Power Association’s Bruce Branch Office
                    after remodeling the front of the building in 2005
                    (Courtesy of Pontotoc Electric Power Association archives)
 
            Since 1935, Pontotoc Electric Power Association has had only five general managers, and one interim manager. These were Wilbur M. Dent, (March 1935 – December 1938), L. E. Price (first quarter 1939 – August 1940), James Cyrus “Cy” Sneed, Jr. (September 1940 – June 1977), William Raymond “Bill” Jackson (July 1977 – June 1998), and Lawrence C. “Chuck” Howell, Jr. (July 1998 – present). K. L. “Bill” Frantz served as interim manager during Sneed’s term of military service during World War II from July 1942 until after the end of the war in 1945 [28]. Cy Sneed was one of the founding members of the Central Service Association in Tupelo in 1938. Central Service Association serves as an outsource provider for customer billing and computer services for most of the Tennessee Valley Authority power distributors. He was also one of the founding members of the North Mississippi Industrial Development Association (NMIDA) which was established in West Point in 1951 to seek industrial recruitment for North Mississippi. Mr. Sneed also was one of the leaders in the formation of the Pontotoc County Development Association. A photograph of Bill Jackson, Cy Sneed and Chuck Howell taken at the 50th Annual Meeting of the North Mississippi Industrial Development Association on October 30, 2000 is shown in Figure 16.
                       
 
 

References

 

1.  Cooke, Morris Llewellyn.  “The Early Days of the Rural Electrification Idea: 

             1914 – 1936.”  The American Political Science Review, Vol. XLII, No. 3,

             June 1948, p. 444. Washington, D.C.

  2.  “2007 Statewide Directory, Electric Power Associations of Mississippi,” p. 8.

             Cooperative Services Division of the Electric Power Associations of Mississippi,

             Ridgeland, Mississippi, 2007.

  3.  Cooke, Morris Llewellyn.  “The Early Days of the Rural Electrification Idea: 

             1914 – 1936.”  The American Political Science Review, Vol. XLII, No. 3,

             June 1948, p. 436. Washington, D.C.

  4.  Phillips, Winnie Ellis.  “Rural Electrification in Mississippi, 1934 – 1970,” p. 3-4.

       Electric Power Associations of Mississippi, Jackson, Mississippi, 1985.

 

 5.  TennesseeValley Authority Act of 1933, Sec. 10 (48 Stat. 58, 64; United States

             Code, Sec. 831 et seq., 1940).

  6.  Cooke, Morris Llewellyn.  “The Early Days of the Rural Electrification Idea: 

             1914 – 1936.”  The American Political Science Review, Vol. XLII, No. 3,

             June 1948, p. 443. Washington, D.C.

 7.  Cooke, Morris Llewellyn.  “The Early Days of the Rural Electrification Idea: 

             1914 – 1936.”  The American Political Science Review, Vol. XLII, No. 3,

             June 1948, p. 443. Washington, D.C.

  8.  PontotocCounty Leads in Rural Electrification.”  The Pontotoc Progress

            newspaper, Thursday, January 11, 1934, p. 1.

  9.  “First TVA Construction in PontotocCounty.”  The Pontotoc Progress newspaper,

              Thursday, January 25, 1934, p. 1.

10.  “A Look Back to 1934 … First TVA Pole Erected in Mississippi.”  TVARA

             Newsletter – The TVA Retirees Association, September 2003, p. 1.

11.  “PEPA Marks Anniversary With Almost 8,000 Electric Customers – Eight Fold

              Growth Heralded in Special Progress Section.”  The Pontotoc Progress

               newspaper, April 8, 1965,  p. 1.

 12.  “Three Times As Much Electricity For Old Price.”  The Pontotoc Progress

               newspaper, Thursday, September 16, 1937, p. 1.

 13.  Form County Electric Association, Second Meeting To Be Held Saturday,

    October 7, Rankin To Speak.”  The Pontotoc Progress newspaper, Thursday,

    October 5, 1933.

 14.  PontotocCounty Electric Power Association.”  Electric Power Association –

              Domestic – Information.  Mississippi Secretary of State Business Services.

              Retrieved from https://secure.sos.state.ms.us/busserv/corp/soskb/Corp.asp?23231

              on March 31, 2008.

 15.  Phillips, Winnie Ellis.  “Rural Electrification in Mississippi, 1934 – 1970,” p. 20.  

             Electric Power Associations of Mississippi, Jackson, Mississippi, 1985.

 16.  Phillips, Winnie Ellis.  “Rural Electrification in Mississippi, 1934 – 1970,” p. 20. 

             Electric Power Associations of Mississippi, Jackson, Mississippi, 1985.

 17.  Phillips, Winnie Ellis.  “Rural Electrification in Mississippi, 1934 – 1970,” p. 21.

             Electric Power Associations of Mississippi, Jackson, Mississippi, 1985.

 18.  Phillips, Winnie Ellis.  “Rural Electrification in Mississippi, 1934 – 1970,” p. 21. 

             Electric Power Associations of Mississippi, Jackson, Mississippi, 1985.

 19.  “Pontotoc Electric Power Association.”  Electric Power Association –        Domestic –

              Information.  Mississippi Secretary of State Business Services.

              Retrieved from https://secure.sos.state.ms.us/busserv/corp/soskb/Corp.asp?23239

              on March 31, 2008.

 20.  “City to Have Traffic Lights – Alderman to Buy Two Red and Green Signal Lights

              Next Month.”  The Pontotoc Progress newspaper, June 10, 1937, p. 1.

 21.  “High Line Crew Headquarters Here – 200 Men to Be Here At Peak of Building

               Line to Sardis Dam.”  The Pontotoc Progress newspaper, June 17, 1937, p. 1.

22.  “T.V.A. Line Completed – Tupelo to Pontotoc.”  The Pontotoc Progress newspaper,

               August 19, 1937, p. 1.

 23.  “More Power For Pontotoc TVA – Extensive Rural Construction Lines Will Serve

               Numbers of New Customers.”  The Pontotoc Progress newspaper, May 22,

               1947, p. 1.

 24.  “PEPA Marks Anniversary With Almost 8,000 Electric Customers – Eight Fold

               Growth Heralded in Special Progress Section.”  The Pontotoc Progress

                newspaper, April 8, 1965, p. 8.

 25.  “Power Ass’n. Office Job to Fulton Firm.”  The Pontotoc Progress newspaper,

               January 19, 1950, p. 1.

 26.  “Heavy Damage As Ice-laden Trees Crash.  Power Lines, Phone Lines Out.”

               The Pontotoc Progress newspaper, February 1, 1951, p. 1.

 27.  “Contract Let for PowerBuilding.” The Calhoun County Journal newspaper,

               September 10, 1953.

28.  “Up Go the Lights.”  The Pontotoc Progress newspaper, December 6, 1956, p. 1.

 29.  “Good People Are Behind PEPA’s Success – Former PEPA manager J. C. Sneed, Jr.

               recalls the ups and downs of his 37 years at the consumer-owned cooperative.” 

               Today In Mississippi, March 2000, p. 14-B.

 30.  “PEPA Bruce Substation Is Increased by 2-½.”  The Pontotoc Progress newspaper,

               July 19, 1962, p. 1.

31.  “PEPA Expansion Set To Boost Power Capacity In Area Six-Fold.”  The Pontotoc

              Progress newspaper, December 27, 1962, p. 1.

 32.  “New Substation Is Mark of Power Growth.”  The Pontotoc Progress newspaper, 

              April 4, 1968, p.1.

33.   “Debt Free With Expanded System – Pontotoc Electric Power Association Makes

               Final Payment To REA.”  The Pontotoc Progress newspaper, October 24, 1968,

               p. 1.

34.  WeekendIceStormGlazesCounty; Knocks Power Out.”  The Pontotoc Progress

               newspaper, January 11, 1973, p. 1.

 35.  “TVA Expanding Facilities for Pontotoc Electric Power.”  The Pontotoc Progress

               newspaper, April 25, 1974, p. 2.

 36.  “New PEPA Facilities Now In Use.”  The Pontotoc Progress newspaper, October 16,

               1975, p. 1.

37.  IceStormPummelsCounty – Thousands Left Without Power.”  The Pontotoc

               Progress newspaper, February 17, 1994, p. 1.

 38.  “New Substation Will Keep Lights Burning Longer.”  The Pontotoc Progress

               newspaper, November 18, 1998, p. 1.

39.  “PEPA Open House.”  The Calhoun County Journal newspaper, September 1, 2005,

               p. 3.

 40.  Electric Power Associations of Mississippi 2008 Statewide Directory. pp. 10-15.

              Cooperative Services Division, Electric Power Associations of Mississippi,   

              Jackson, Mississippi.  2008.

 41.  “Good People Are Behind PEPA’s Success – Former PEPA manager J. C. Sneed, Jr.

              recalls the ups and downs of his 37 years at the consumer-owned cooperative.” 

              Today In Mississippi, March 2000, p. 14-B.

 


 


 
                        



Quick Facts

  • Total Electric Customers: 19,111
  • C~I Customers              <50kW Demand: 3,197
  • C~I Customers                 51-4,999kW Demand: 266
  • C~I Customers         >5,000kW Demand: 1
  • Total System Assets:       $73,145.539
  • Total Taxes Paid FY 2014: $463,609
  • Miles Of Line: 1,708
  • 11 Customers/Mile of Line
  • Average Residential Use: 1,289 kWh/Month
  • Delivery Points: 6
  • Average Load Factor: 61.10%
  • Fulltime Employees: 63
*As of June, 2015